Why is Your Computer Freezing?

If you find your computer unresponsive at times, it’s time to get an in-depth check of your system. First, you need to identify the cause behind computer freezing to detect if it is hardware related or software specific. Identifying the cause helps users to resolve the problem quickly. They are many types of computer freeze issues, and each type is detected by system behavior. System freeze can be grouped into hang, generic freeze, random hang and single-app freeze
Hang— every time a specific set of a procedure is carried out on a PC, it hangs up and requests to be restarted to recover.
Generic freeze—the system becomes unresponsive and automatically goes to usual functional state without troubleshooting.
Random hang— occurs when the PC turns unresponsive often at regular intervals of time, and the user has to restart it.
Single-app Freeze —this occurs when PC freezes abnormally when the user attempts to start a particular program, a game or a heavy browsing website.
The main reasons (software as well as hardware) that cause a computer to hang are too many apps running, driver issues, operating system issues, excess heating up, hardware misconfiguration, insufficient RAM, BIOS settings, power issues, external devices, and hard drive malfunction.
References
https://www.stellarinfo.com/blog/top-10-reasons-computer-freezing/
http://computersupportservicesnj.com/5-main-reasons-for-why-computer-keeps-freezing/

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What is Geometry?

Geometry is a branch of mathematics that focuses on questions of size, shape, the properties of space, and relative position of figures. Mathematicians who work in the geometry field are referred to as geometers.
In several early cultures, geometry arose as a practical approach for dealing with volumes, areas, and lengths. While geometry has changed significantly over the years, there are several concepts that are more or less basic to geometry. These concepts include points, surfaces, angles, curves, and lines.
Geometry is applied in many fields, including physics, architecture, art, as well as other branches of mathematics. Modern geometry has several subfields:
Euclidean geometry—this is geometry in its classical sense. It has applications in crystallography, computer science, and various branches of contemporary mathematics.
Differential geometry—this subfield uses techniques of linear algebra and calculus to study problems in geometry.
Topology –This subfield deals with the geometric object’s properties that are unaffected by continuous mappings.
Convex geometry –examines convex shapes in the space of Euclidean and it’s more abstract analogs.
Algebraic geometry– studies geometry using multivariate polynomials or other algebraic methods.
Discrete geometry—it mainly focuses on relative position questions of geometric objects, such as lines, points, and circles.
References
http://www.corestandards.org/Math/Content/HSG/introduction/
https://www.cut-the-knot.org/WhatIs/WhatIsGeometry.shtml

What is Cybercrime?

 

You often hear the word ‘cybercrime’ discussed nowadays. Due to the high number of connected devices and people, cybercrime is very common. But what is it exactly?
Cybercrime is a crime that involves a network and a computer. The computer may be the target, or it may be used in a commission of a crime. Cybercrime can also be defined as an offense that is committed against an individual or a group of individuals with a motive to intentionally cause mental or physical harm, using modern telecommunication networks such as mobile phones and the internet.
Cybercrimes may threaten a nation or person’s financial health and security. Types of cybercrimes include hacking, unwarranted mass-surveillance, copyright infringement, child grooming, and child pornography. Other common types of cybercrime are online scams and fraud, attacks on computer systems, identity theft and prohibited or illegal online content. Globally, both government and non-state actors are involved in cybercrimes, including financial theft, espionage, and other cross-border crimes. Sometimes, an activity that involves the interest of at least one country and cross-international borders is referred to as cyber warfare.
In the past, computer-related crimes were committed mainly by individuals. Nowadays, we are seeing very complex cybercriminal networks bringing together people from various parts of the world in real time to commit offenses on an unprecedented scale.
References
https://www.interpol.int/Crime-areas/Cybercrime/Cybercrime
https://www.acorn.gov.au/learn-about-cybercrime
https://us.norton.com/cybercrime-definition

Three Greatest Mathematicians of All Time

Mathematics is important to the understanding of the world. Often referred to as the language of the universe, mathematics has made an impact in almost all place, from the satellite that beams your TV to the faucet in your kitchen to your home. Based on their contributions to mathematics, the following are top three greatest mathematicians:
Leonhard Euler
Living from 1707 to 1783, Euler is the greatest mathematician to have ever walked on earth. It is believed that all mathematical formulas were named after the next person after being discovered by Euler. His primary contribution to the field of mathematics includes the introduction of mathematical notation such as the concept of a function, shorthand trigonometric functions, The Euler Constant, the letter ‘/i’ for imaginary units and the symbol pi for the ratio of a circumference of a circle to its diameter.
Carl Friedrich Gauss
Also referred to as the ‘Prince of Mathematics,’ Gauss is known for his outstanding mental ability. He made several important contributions to mathematics. For instance, he introduced the Gaussian gravitational constant and proved the fundamental theorem of algebra.
G. F. Bernhard Riemann
Born to a poor family in 1826, Bernhard Riemann rose to become one of the most prominent mathematicians in the world in the 19th Century. He has many theorems bearing his name including Riemannian geometry, the Riemann Integral, and Riemannian Surfaces.
References
http://listverse.com/2010/12/07/top-10-greatest-mathematicians/